• The European Plastic Packaging Market Overcomes the Pandemic and Prepares to Face the New Green Regulation

    The European Plastic Packaging Market Overcomes the Pandemic and Prepares to Face the New Green Regulation

    IndexBox has just published a new report: 'EU - Plastic Packaging - Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights'. Here is a summary of the report's key findings.

  • Logoplaste announces new partner to support future growth

    Logoplaste announces new partner to support future growth

    26 February 2021: Logoplaste, a leading global designer and manufacturer of innovative and sustainable  rigid plastic packaging solutions for the world’s premier FMCG brands, today announced that Ontario  Teachers’ Pension Plan Board (Ontario Teachers’) has agreed to acquire The Carlyle Group’s (NASDAQ: CG) majority stake in the company. Current Logoplaste shareholders Filipe de Botton and Alexandre Relvas will  retain their approximately 40% stake in the business as it embarks on its next phase of growth.

  • Compression and total quality control – The SACMI range at Chinaplas 2021

    Compression and total quality control – The SACMI range at Chinaplas 2021

    With over 650 machines sold in China, SACMI is the country’s absolute leader in cap manufacturing solutions that use compression technology. In April the fair will showcase all the latest, with a sharp focus on efficiency and integrated process control.

  • The bad, the ugly and the good - New consumer research highlights packaging frustrations and delights

    The bad, the ugly and the good - New consumer research highlights packaging frustrations and delights

    How attitudes to packaging and its functionality have changed over the past seven years, based on a detailed survey of 1,000 UK consumers, is the subject of a new White Paper from leading packaging tapes provider Essentra Tapes. 
    The full results were first revealed at a recent ThePackHub webinar, where Essentra Tape’s head of marketing & development, Ian Beresford, unveiled consumers’ latest opinions and compared them to previous research in 2013. 

  • Enval helps Little Freddie increase pouch recycling by 526%

    Enval helps Little Freddie increase pouch recycling by 526%

    News: 

    Since the beginning of our partnership, we’ve enabled the recycling of over 625,000 pouches that otherwise would have ended up in landfill, or polluted our natural environment.

    The Laminates League’s model is simple: customers can request pre-paid recycling kits from participating brands’ websites that they can then use to send us their pouches. Using our unique proprietary pyrolysis solution, which can handle low-density packaging waste, we recycle each component of the pouches into materials that can be reprocessed and put back into circulation. Our technology separates the plastic and aluminium from the pouches and prevents them from ending up in landfill. This ultimately creates a circular process for aluminium recycling, as waste materials can be turned into the building blocks used to manufacture new materials, before being reintroduced into the supply chain. The recycled aluminium is re-used to make new aluminium products, while the plastic is recycled into oil; we are now working with the plastic producers to use this oil to make new virgin plastics.

    2020 marked a turning point for Little Freddie, as it was able to introduce our recycling mailbags in 130 Sainsbury’s stores and online, a first in the UK. The bags retail at 99p at no profit and are now also stocked online by Ocado, Eversfield Organic and Farmdrop, as well as in-store by Daylesford. This expansion into supermarkets and online retailers has smoothed the process for end consumers, making it easier than ever before for them to send us their pouches.

    We also expanded the Little Freddie scheme further, accepting pouches from all baby food brands. As a result, the number of pouches recycled has skyrocketed, increasing by an astonishing 526%. This is an incredible achievement for the Laminates League. With more brands joining our recycling scheme we are confident that we will soon be able to work with local authorities, waste handlers and other contractors to develop and implement a proper collection and segregation system across the UK.

    If you are a brand or a retailer wishing to expand the recyclability of your products and strengthen the profitability and sustainability of your company, then please contact us to join the Laminates League.

  • Neopac Introduces Lightweight Plastic Tube with Reduced Wall Thickness for Enhanced Sustainability

    Neopac Introduces Lightweight Plastic Tube with Reduced Wall Thickness for Enhanced Sustainability

    Latest addition to company’s EcoDesign portfolio of sustainability-minded tubes uses up to 30% less virgin materials 

  • Mondi launches AegisPaper, a complete range of recyclable barrier papers for sustainable packaging solutions

    Mondi launches AegisPaper, a complete range of recyclable barrier papers for sustainable packaging solutions


    Offering a fully integrated value chain solution, Mondi is launching a range of recyclable barrier papers that can be used as a replacement for plastic films and laminates 
    The range provides a one-stop shop solution from paper production to barrier application and can run on existing form-fill-and-seal (FFS) lines
    This product innovation provides a sustainable packaging alternative in particular for FMCG applications

  • A milestone in the recyclability of plastics

    A milestone in the recyclability of plastics

    On 2 February 2021, a truck filled with crude oil, which was recovered by chemically recycling reusable materials from SÜDPACK, left the RECENSO pilot plant in Ennigerloh near Münster. The goal of the strategic collaboration is to take reusable materials that cannot currently be mechanically recycled and recycle them on an industrial scale using the CARBOLIQ process to recover raw materials and consequently close further loops in the packaging industry. 

  • Theoretical maximum for recycling of plastic packaging is scientifically substantiated

    Theoretical maximum for recycling of plastic packaging is scientifically substantiated

    News: 

    This research is highly relevant to all stakeholders as most of them strive for higher recycling rates to reduce the environmental impact of plastic waste. Ideally, plastic food packaging is recycled into new packaging. But only limited types of packaging are suitable for circular recycling, most can only be recycled for non-food applications, and others cannot be recycled at all .

    All stakeholders will have to take drastic and coordinated action
    The situation in 2017 was described in detail as a baseline measurement. The Dutch recycling value chain for plastic packaging waste was relatively well developed globally in 2017. The recycling rate was approximately 37% in 2017. In addition, the average polymer purity of the recycled plastics in 2017 was only 93%. To move beyond this status quo, all improvement measures were modeled in a complex material flow analysis model.

    First of all, all packaging types were systematically redesigned for recycling. Czech American packaging machine manufacturer Viking Masek packs emotions | Empack Den Bosch 2021 where all packaging components have been optimized.
    Second, collection and mechanical recovery rates were increased to the maximum levels achieved.
    Third, the transfer coefficients of the best available recycling technologies were selected and the entire model was rerun. This leads to a total recycling percentage of 72%. The average polymer purity of the recycled plastics is 97%.
    In such an ideal circular value chain, more recycled plastics are produced that are suitable for more demanding applications, such as food packaging, compared to the 2017 value chain. However, this requires all stakeholders to implement drastic and coordinated measures, which mean unprecedented investments. , with which this optimal circular recycling value chain for plastic packaging can be realized. In addition, this optimized recycling chain is still largely based on the use of crude oil as raw material and the use of a lot of recyclate in non-food contact applications.

  • A seagrass type can catch and remove plastics from the ocean, says study

    A seagrass type can catch and remove plastics from the ocean, says study

    News: 

    A species of seagrass, named Posidonia oceanica, has the ability to catch and remove plastics from the ocean, according to researchers at the University of Barcelona.

    The study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, describes the role of the Posidonia as a filter and trap for plastics in coastal areas.

    Because of this, it’s seen as a pioneering natural mechanism to take and remove these materials from the sea.

    As part of the study, the team analysed the trapping and extraction of plastic in great seagrasses of the Posidonia on the coasts of Majorca.

    Anna Sànchez-Vidal, a researcher at the Department of Ocean and Earth Dynamics at the University of Barcelona, said: “Everything suggests that plastics are trapped in the Posidonia seagrass. In the grasslands, the plastics are incorporated to agglomerates of natural fibre with a ball shape – aegagropila or Posidonia Neptune balls – which are expulsed from the marine environment during storms.

    “According to the analyses, the trapped microplastics in the prairies of the Posidonia oceanica are mainly filaments, fibres and fragments of polymers which are denser than the seawater such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET).”

     

    An estimated 1,470 plastics are taken per kilogramme of Posidonia oceanica seagrass, says study
    Typically Posidonia aegagropila – which is a type of algae – are expelled from the prairies – a type of grassland – during periods of strong waves and a part ends up piled in the beaches.

    And, although there are no studies that quantify the amount of aegagropilae expelled from the marine environment, it’s estimated that about 1,470 plastics are taken per kilogramme of plant fibre.

    These amounts are significantly higher than those captured through leaves or sand.

    Sànchez-Vidal added: “we cannot completely know the magnitude of this plastic export to the land.

    However, first estimations reveal that Posidonia balls could catch up to 867 million plastics per year.”

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