Development Of Mineralbased Compound For Blow Molding

Caco3 as additive for blow molding. Plastimin, wilder, ky, has developed a mineral made from calcium carbonate caco3 that can enhance the output of multilayer, blow molded bottles by 15 to 20 percent. The additive, made from crushed marble that is mined and compounded, has been used in plastic bags for about 15 years to enhance production. However, blow

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Plastimin, wilder, ky, has developed a mineral made from calcium carbonate caco3 that can enhance the output of multilayer, blow molded bottles by 15 to 20 percent. The additive, made from crushed marble that is mined and compounded, has been used in plastic bags for about 15 years to enhance production. However, blow molders have been more reluctant to add the compound and increase their costs, even though less material is needed. Plastimin and development partner heritage bag, carrollton, tx, worked to develop a caco3 reinforcement that offers a lower cost option with advanced processability features, he said. The mineral additive can spike production and offer corresponding benefits in resin, natural gas, and energy reductions while decreasing energy usage and lowering the carbon footprint. The additive also can be recycled when used with a host of resins, including polyethylene and polypropylene based packages. It is blow molding and injection molding where the company expects to gain the most in new market share. The compound disperses well in a bottle with no negative impact on properties while offering better adhesion and strength. The company also is targeting injection molded caps and closures in personal care, where the material again saves resin use and protects against warpage. The use of the mineral gained some traction several years ago in the wake of sharp resin price increases after hurricane katrina. But former iterations of the technology still needed to prove that performance advantages outweighed costs and potential weight gain with the use of the additive. Plastimin gets its material from mines in picayune, ms, and sylacauga, al, close to the appalachian mountains. The material, coming from footballsized rock, is crushed to a fine particle weight and then added into a compounding line with base resin.

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