• Replacing plastic with plant pulp for sustainable packaging attracts a billionaire backer

    Their technology managed to grab the attention of — and $2.2 million in funding from — Horizons Ventures, the venture capital fund managing the money of Li Ka-shing, one of the world’s wealthiest men.

    It’s an opportune time to launch a novel packaging technology, as the European Union has already instituted a ban on single-use plastic items, which will go into effect in 2021. Taking their lead, companies like Nestlé and Walmart have pledged to use only sustainable packaging for products beginning in 2025.

    The environmental toll that packaging takes on the earth’s habitats is already a concern for many, and the urgency to find a solution is only mounting with consumers and businesses actually producing more waste in the rush to change consumer behavior and socially distance as a result of the COVID-19 global pandemic.

    “I like technologies that focus on carbon reductions,” said Chris Liu, Horizons Ventures’ representative in Australia.

    A longtime tech and product executive who had stints at Intel and Fjord, a digital design studio, Liu relocated to Australia recently and has actually taken himself off the grid.

    Living in Western Australia, the climate emergency was brought directly to the top of Liu’s mind when the wildfires, which raged through the country, came within two kilometers of his new home.

    For Mark Appleford, it wasn’t so much the fires as it was the garbage that kept washing up on the shores of his beloved beaches.

    Over beers at a barbecue he began talking to his eventual co-founder, Stuart Gordon, about the environmental problem they’d solve if they had the ability to change things. They settled on plastics.

    Working in Appleford’s laundry room they started developing the technology that would become Varden. That early laundry room-work in 2015 led to a small seed round and the company’s long slog to get an initial product in the hands of test customers.

    Finagling some time with the New Zealand manufacturer Fisher and Paykel, the two co-founders put together an early prototype of their coffee pods made from sugarcane bagasse, a waste byproduct of the sugar feedstock.

    “We worked backwards through customers to supply chain, which led us to material selection, which was something that would allow us to create a product that people understood,” said Gordon.

    The production process has evolved to fit inside a 40-foot container that holds the firm’s machine, which takes agricultural waste and converts that waste into packaging.

    Instead of using rollers like a paper mill, Varden’s technology uses a thermoform to mold the plant waste into a product that has the same properties as plastic.

    It removes a complicated step that’s been essential to the current crop of bioplastics, which use bacteria to convert plant waste into plastic substitutes that are then sold to the industry.

    “It looks like paper… you can tear it in half and it sounds like paper when you rip it, and you can throw it in the bin,” said Appleford.

    Gordon said that the company’s containers are outperforming commodity based plastics. And the first target for replacement, the founders said, is coffee capsules.

    “We went for coffee because it’s the hardest,” said Appleford.

    It’s also a huge market, according to the company. Varden estimates there are more than 20 billion coffee pods consumed every year.

    With the new money, Varden will begin manufacturing at scale to meet initial demand from pilot customers and is hoping to expand its product line to include medical blister packs in addition to the coffee pods.

    “A pilot plant on the products we’re looking at is a pilot plant that can generate 20 million units a year,” said Gordon.

    Both men are hoping that their product — and others like it — can usher in a generation of new sustainable packaging materials that are better for the environment at every stage of their life cycle.

    “The next generation of packaging will be better… there are plant-based flexibles for your salads, for your potato chips… [But] the next generation of molded packaging is us… bioplastic will ultimately go.”

  • BALL CORPORATION AGREES TO ACQUIRE TUBEX ALUMINUM AEROSOL PACKAGING FACILITY IN BRAZIL

    The Sao Paolo-area plant includes eight extruded aluminum aerosol can lines, which produce personal care packaging for global and local customers located in Brazil. It employs approximately 300 people.

    "As the demand for sustainable aluminum packaging continues to grow among customers and consumers worldwide, this investment allows us to broaden our geographic reach and serve this expanding market as one of the leading aluminum aerosol suppliers in Brazil," said John A. Hayes, Ball's chairman, president and chief executive officer.

    The plant will become part of Ball's aluminum aerosol packaging division, and complements Ball's global aluminum aerosol and slug business in Europe, North America and Asia, led by Stan Platek, vice president and general manager.

    About Ball Corporation
    Ball Corporation supplies innovative, sustainable aluminum packaging solutions for beverage, personal care and household products customers, as well as aerospace and other technologies and services primarily for the U.S. government. Ball Corporation and its subsidiaries employ more than 18,300 people worldwide and reported 2019 sales of $11.5 billion. For more information, visit www.ball.com, or connect with us on Facebook or Twitter.

    Forward-Looking Statements
    This release contains "forward-looking" statements concerning future events and financial performance. Words such as "expects," "anticipates," "estimates," "believes," "targets," "likely," "positions" and similar expressions typically identify forward-looking statements, which are generally any statements other than statements of historical fact. Such statements are based on current expectations or views of the future and are subject to risks and uncertainties, which could cause actual results or events to differ materially from those expressed or implied. You should therefore not place undue reliance upon any forward-looking statements and any such statements should be read in conjunction with, and, qualified in their entirety by, the cautionary statements referenced below. The company undertakes no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. Key factors, risks and uncertainties that could cause actual outcomes and results to be different are summarized in filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including Exhibit 99 in our Form 10-K, which are available on our website and at www.sec.gov. Additional factors that might affect: a) our packaging segments include product capacity, supply, and demand constraints and fluctuations; availability/cost of raw materials and logistics; competitive packaging, pricing and substitution; changes in climate and weather; footprint adjustments and other manufacturing changes, including the start-up of new facilities and lines; failure to achieve synergies, productivity improvements or cost reductions; mandatory deposit or other restrictive packaging laws; customer and supplier consolidation; power and supply chain interruptions, including due to disease outbreaks; potential delays and tariffs related to the U.K's departure from the EU; changes in major customer or supplier contracts or a loss of a major customer or supplier; political instability and sanctions; currency controls; changes in foreign exchange or tax rates; and tariffs, trade actions, or other governmental actions in any country affecting goods produced by us or in our supply chain, including imported raw materials, such as pursuant to Section 232 of the U.S. Trade Expansion Act of 1962 or Section 301 of Trade Act of 1974; b) our aerospace segment include funding, authorization, availability and returns of government and commercial contracts; and delays, extensions and technical uncertainties affecting segment contracts; c) the company as a whole include those listed plus: the extent to which sustainability-related opportunities arise and can be capitalized upon; changes in senior management, succession, and the ability to attract and retain skilled labor; regulatory action or issues including tax, environmental, health and workplace safety, including U.S. FDA and other actions or public concerns affecting products filled in our containers, or chemicals or substances used in raw materials or in the manufacturing process; technological developments and innovations; information technology initiatives and management of cyber-security processes; litigation; strikes; disease; labor cost changes; rates of return on assets of the company's defined benefit retirement plans; pension changes; uncertainties surrounding geopolitical events and governmental policies both in the U.S. and in other countries, including the U.S. government elections, budget, sequestration and debt limit; reduced cash flow; interest rates affecting our debt; and successful or unsuccessful joint ventures, acquisitions and divestitures.

  • BALL CORPORATION ANNOUNCES APPROVAL OF SCIENCE BASED TARGETS TO REDUCE GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS

    "The private sector has a vital role to play in accelerating a low carbon economy and, as the world's leading supplier of sustainable aluminum beverage packaging, we are dedicated to doing our part for our customers and the planet," said Kathleen Pitre, Chief Commercial and Sustainability Officer. "These approved science-based targets demonstrate our commitment to help our customers reach their sustainability goals and deliver lower carbon packaging that enables a circular economy."

    Organized by CDP, the United Nations Global Compact, the World Resources Institute and the World Wide Fund for Nature, the Science Based Targets initiative is a collaboration of more than 800 global companies that have set clearly-defined corporate emission reduction goals aligned with the latest climate science.

    The approved science-based targets are the next step in Ball's progressing climate strategy. Over the last year, Ball has signed renewable energy agreements to address 100 percent of its North American energy use, achieved a global first for can manufacturers by earning the Aluminium Stewardship Initiative Certification for all 23 of its EMEA plants, and earned its place on the Dow Jones Sustainability Indices for the seventh consecutive year. This year, Ball will announce additional renewable energy agreements in the EU and launch its comparative life-cycle assessment for the United States, Europe and Brazil with the goal of helping the beverage industry move toward a truly circular economy.

    For more information about Ball's ongoing sustainability efforts, please visit www.ball.com/sustainability.

    About Ball Corporation

    Ball Corporation supplies innovative, sustainable aluminum packaging solutions for beverage, personal care and household products customers, as well as aerospace and other technologies and services primarily for the U.S. government. Ball Corporation and its subsidiaries employ more than 18,300 people worldwide and reported 2019 net sales of $11.5 billion. For more information, visit www.ball.com, or connect with us on Facebook or Twitter.

    Forward-Looking Statements

    This release contains "forward-looking" statements concerning future events and financial performance. Words such as "expects," "anticipates," "estimates," "believes," "targets," "likely," "positions" and similar expressions typically identify forward-looking statements, which are generally any statements other than statements of historical fact. Such statements are based on current expectations or views of the future and are subject to risks and uncertainties, which could cause actual results or events to differ materially from those expressed or implied. You should therefore not place undue reliance upon any forward-looking statements and any such statements should be read in conjunction with, and, qualified in their entirety by, the cautionary statements referenced below. The company undertakes no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. Key factors, risks and uncertainties that could cause actual outcomes and results to be different are summarized in filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including Exhibit 99 in our Form 10-K, which are available on our website and at www.sec.gov. Additional factors that might affect: a) our packaging segments include product capacity, supply, and demand constraints and fluctuations; availability/cost of raw materials and logistics; competitive packaging, pricing and substitution; changes in climate and weather; footprint adjustments and other manufacturing changes, including the startup of new facilities and lines; failure to achieve synergies, productivity improvements or cost reductions; mandatory deposit or other restrictive packaging laws; customer and supplier consolidation; power and supply chain interruptions, including due to virus and disease outbreaks; potential delays and tariffs related to the U.K's departure from the EU; changes in major customer or supplier contracts or a loss of a major customer or supplier; political instability and sanctions; currency controls; changes in foreign exchange or tax rates; and tariffs, trade actions, or other governmental actions, including business restrictions and shelter-in-place orders in any country affecting goods produced by us or in our supply chain, including imported raw materials, such as those related to COVID-19 and those pursuant to Section 232 of the U.S. Trade Expansion Act of 1962 or Section 301 of Trade Act of 1974; b) our aerospace segment include funding, authorization, availability and returns of government and commercial contracts; and delays, extensions and technical uncertainties affecting segment contracts; c) the company as a whole include those listed plus: the extent to which sustainability-related opportunities arise and can be capitalized upon; changes in senior management, succession, and the ability to attract and retain skilled labor; regulatory action or issues including tax, environmental, health and workplace safety, including U.S. FDA and other actions or public concerns affecting products filled in our containers, or chemicals or substances used in raw materials or in the manufacturing process; technological developments and innovations; the ability to manage cyber threats and the success of information technology initiatives; litigation; strikes; disease; pandemic; labor cost changes; rates of return on assets of the company's defined benefit retirement plans; pension changes; uncertainties surrounding geopolitical events and governmental policies both in the U.S. and in other countries, including policies, orders and actions related to COVID-19, the U.S. government elections, budget, sequestration and debt limit; reduced cash flow; interest rates affecting our debt; and successful or unsuccessful joint ventures, acquisitions and divestitures, and their effects on our operating results and business generally.

  • About Kaypee

    Promoted and founded in the year 2011 by Mr Kapil Patel and Mr Hiren Patel - second generation entrepreneurs - a great story of entrepreneurship, perseverance, operational excellence and belief. We are offering wide range of packing solution for food grade products like grains, spices, pulses, flours, animal feed, tea/coffee and non-food grade like cement, seeds, fertilizers, chemicals, coal, promotional bags, detergents and all powder & granulated material.

    We started with a production capacity of five thousand bags per day in the inception year 2011. Since then, the company is continuously growing and today produces half-a-million bags per day. We strive to provide unique quality products, innovative solutions, excellent client servicing, trust, credibility and a team of young dedicated professionals to add value to our business.

    Kaypee’s product range encompasses the needs of each and every requirement of the customer. The company met the ever-changing demands and has maintained a judicious balance of quality and timely delivery commitments to customers. The company is further aimed at diversification, improvement in technical services, innovations, investing in infrastructure, professional and skilled manpower etc.

    Kaypee is committed to provide quality products that are best in the industry along with excellent client service. Our products are highly efficient, durable, and reliable. These are highly appreciated and demanded by our clients around the globe. We are also backed by well-equipped state-of-art infrastructure, which allows us to maintain a rapid rate of production.

  • KBB blow molding machines - New standard in consumer packaging

    During the development of the pioneering machine concept, the focus was upon the decisive requirements of the market
    - in accordance with the major themes of creativity, efficiency and benchmarks:

    Creativity

    Growing demands in relation to the flexibility and design freedom mean blow molding machines are constantly facing new challenges. Discover the creative solutions of the new KBB series.

    Efficiency

    Scarce resources and ever increasing energy prices demand ever more efficient production processes. The KBB already meets these requirements.

    Benchmarks

    There are many sides to economic efficiency. That is why the operation and servicing of the KBB series has been designed with simplicity and convenience as key priorities.

  • The fast way from an idea to market

    In addition to the Bonn pilot plant, Kautex customers also have access to laboratories in the USA and China where material tests and samples can be carried out directly on site. Direct on-site exchange is particularly important for development work with customers. With decentralized services, Kautex Maschinenbau is more efficient, faster, and better able to respond to regional market needs. A large number of services are available to customers at the international laboratory locations. These include the sampling of moulds or pilot tools for risk reduction on series production tools as well as the testing of new materials and production processes. All tests at Kautex's decentralized laboratory sites are performed by process engineers with many years of experience. We advise you on the product design and ensure that the design is suitable for blow molding. The implementation of the products in 3D as well as a process and product simulation are part of our daily tools of the trade. With the possibilities of sampling and prototyping from a single source, we provide important decision-making bases. The competitiveness of companies today depends very much on the speed with which new ideas are implemented. This is why the technical facilities are available to our customers as well as to raw material manufacturers and toolmakers for joint work. In addition, we support our customers by jointly handling pilot and small series. Thanks to consistent project management and coordination from a single source, time to market is shortened. In addition, you can count on lower development costs because we as a partner provide you with a well-functioning infrastructure. Nothing stands in the way of a new product.

  • Conventional plastic industry is using ‘Coronavirus as an excuse’ to revive old habits

    Speaking to Bio Market Insights, Julia Vol, director of public affairs from flexible compostable packaging company TIPA (@TIPACorp), said: “At the moment politicians are under a lot of pressure from the fossil fuel industry that is losing money every day to setback regulation on single-use plastic under the excuse of fighting the virus. However, we cannot try to solve one problem by creating another. We would like to encourage decision-makers to ask why do we need to revert the ban on items such as straws, plastic cotton buds and stirrers, what purpose does it serve in the fight against the virus?”

    Vol’s comments come at a time when the UK’s Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) recently announced that it would be postponing a ban on plastic straws, stirrers and cotton buds in England until October, owing to the impact of the Coronavirus outbreak on firms. It said the move to delay the ban, which was originally due to come into force this month, was to avoid extra burdens for firms already under pressure as a result of the pandemic.

    Vol maintained that the plastic industry could potentially use Covid-19 to exploit people’s fears around sanitation and hygiene to interfere with legislation banning or regulating the use of single-use plastics. With the oil price being at historic lows, and the public attention is being understandably distracted, the conventional plastic industry is fighting to push demand up in whatever means they can.

    “This could lead the plastic industry to spread a lot of misinformation and exploit Covid-19 to attack non-conventional plastic packaging. They may also promote messaging about the need for more conventional plastic packaging and plastic use,” she said.

    In general, while people have been advised to keep activities such as food shopping to a bare minimum, supermarkets remain one of the few places still open during the Coronavirus outbreak.

    As notoriously busy places that are filled with products touched by a number of people, consumers have become increasingly concerned about the risk of exposure to the virus while doing their shopping, with many taking precautions such as wearing gloves and face masks and not buying single food items without plastic packaging around them.

    Vol said: “Unfortunately, the current crisis has really put a strain on the reduce and reuse solutions due to health, hygiene and safety concerns. The increase in single-use plastic is evident not only in medical use but also in the food industry, and we already see a massive push from the conventional plastic industry to lift up the single-use plastic ban”.

    Rolling back the clock

    As a result of the crisis, some shoppers have become so concerned with coming into contact with other shoppers and their possessions, including reusable shopping bags.

    So much so, that some places around the globe, including San Francisco, have chosen to ban reusable bags altogether in an attempt to protect both customers and supermarket employees from spreading the virus.

    The UK government recently dropped the 5p plastic bag charge for online deliveries to speed up food distribution during the Covid-19 coronavirus outbreak. The plastic bag charge was introduced in England in October 2015 to reduce plastic waste.

    Vol questioned: “While some single-use plastic use is unavoidable due to the health and safety concerns, we shouldn’t lose on the many achievements we’ve had in fighting the plastic crisis. Luckily, we have come a long way in our battle against the plastic pollution both in terms of raw materials and end-of-life solutions and the question is will we manage to leverage these advantages to ensure that the current crisis and the (hopefully temporary) need for single-use plastic will not have negative environmental consequences, which in turn will too have may damage our health.

    But can consumer’s behaviours change when they are still confused over terms such as biodegradability and compostability? Vol seems to think so. She said: “It is tremendous to see how people can adapt and change their behaviour once they feel the urgency – when the crisis first started in the Western world, officials and governments started to promote the hard facts. They said ‘you need to stay at home to prevent the spread of the disease’, amongst other things. People immediately started to change their behaviour overnight. It is amazing how we all started bowing to each other instead of shaking hands and stopped hugging each other, which is intrinsic to human behaviour.

    “This shows that clear and fact-based information can work and change people’s behaviour. Of course, right now, we are in the midst of a crisis, but if you look at the long-term impacts of plastic packaging on our health, I am not sure the effects are much less severe than the coronavirus one. This is because plastic particles go into our food, soil and water supply. The long-term impacts could be as severe as this current crisis and we need to create more urgency and fact-based messaging to drive behaviour change to address the plastic crisis too.

    Looking forward, Vol said she is optimistic about the future, with more and more firms pumping money into sustainable research and development, promoting alternative packaging solutions and sustainable solutions and encouraging their consumers to make the right choices.

  • Demo packaging cases selected

    During the project’s first year, we have clarified the current use and performance of cellulose-based materials in food packaging. We have mapped the already existing solutions, close-to-market materials as well as the ongoing research and product development.

    Based on jointly agreed criteria, we have now selected three demo cases:

    1. Replacing non-degradable plastic in a package for cold cuts or meat (a product that people tend to consume outside – e.g. grilling or picnicking – meaning a higher risk for the package to be dumped in nature)

    2. Replacing single-use-plastic in sweet, crisp or snack wrappers (this type of package is one of the most common ones to be found on sea-shores)

    3. Reducing single-use-packaging of served or delivered food (including perspectives on new business models as well)

    Choosing the materials and products for each demo case is currently ongoing. In demo case 3, Package-Heroes will cooperate with a start-up company, Kamupak.

  • DS Smith develops new boxes for safer deliveries

    Stefano Rossi, CEO of packaging at DS Smith said, “We were approached by several of our food supply customers to design a new packaging solution that would maximise efficiency and provide everyday essentials to many of society’s most vulnerable. “We worked very closely with our customers to design and produce a solution which allows for a ‘stack, drop and go’ approach that is more time efficient, more hygienic and frees up time for more deliveries. Our sustainably designed solution is also fully recyclable at home. “I’m extremely proud of the whole team at DS Smith; their determination to support these initiatives meant that we delivered a new design in under 24 hours. This was subsequently prototyped, tested, manufactured and delivered in less than a week.”

  • OLD SPICE AND SECRET BECOME FIRST MAJOR BRANDS TO INTRODUCE ALL-PAPER, PLASTIC-FREE DEODORANT PACKAGING

    As we celebrate the 50th anniversary of Earth Day this week, we’re excited to announce that Old Spice and Secret are the first major brands to introduce all-paper, plastic-free deodorant packaging available in select Walmart Stores. Starting in May, the first all-paper tube package for select Old Spice and Secret aluminum-free deodorants, co-designed with consumers interested in cutting back on plastic waste, will be available at 500 Walmart stores in the U.S. “If we convert just 10 percent of our current deodorant packages to recycled paper or another recyclable material, it could eliminate up to 1.5 million pounds of plastic waste annually,” said Anitra Marsh, Associate Director of Global Sustainability and Brand Communications, P&G Beauty. “This is just one example of how we are trying to make a difference and build a more sustainable future.” The paper tube package, made of 90 percent recycled paper, is certified by the Forest Stewardship Council and features a “push up” design that would replace some of P&G’s plastic stick deodorant cannisters. P&G, which is completing the second phase of recyclability testing on the new package this fall, hopes to learn how consumers respond to the design. If successful, P&G will expand the new package across more of its line-up. “We co-designed this package with consumers who are interested in cutting back on plastic waste,” said Freddy Bharucha, Vice President of Personal Care, P&G Beauty. “The majority of Gen Z consumers have high expectations for environmentally friendly products.” The paper tube package is one of several ideas that P&G has initiated in hopes of reducing plastic waste. Earlier this year, it reduced the amount of plastic in its Secret antiperspirant and deodorant cannisters by eight percent, saving 900,000 pounds of plastic waste. In October, P&G began selling a limited edition of its best-selling Olay Regenerist Whip with a refill pod that reduces 94 percent of plastic waste. Additionally, it was the first company to join TerraCycle’s LOOP program, which is testing “collect and refill” packages through an e-commerce platform in select cities worldwide. Both P&G and Walmart have publicly declared aggressive goals in sustainability. By 2030, P&G Beauty’s brands have committed to using 100 percent recyclable or reusable packaging while reducing the use of virgin petroleum plastic by 50 percent. By 2025, Walmart is committing zero waste to landfill for its operations in the U.S., U.K., Canada and Japan. “Walmart is steadfast in its commitment to transform retail in the interest of environmental sustainability,” said Jason Kloster, Senior Buying Manager, Body Care & Grooming, Walmart. “As the largest retailer in the world partnering with the largest deodorant and antiperspirant brands in the U.S., we know this new paperboard package has the potential to have significant positive impact and lay the groundwork for even broader impact.”

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